Archive for February, 2015

Brazil, Soccer & Science

Friday, February 6th, 2015

Brazil is changing. Once the soccer country with five World Cup Trophies, it lost to Germany in the last World Cup in 2014 and did not impress the world like it used to. Soccer is changing. European countries, especially Germany, have been training, building infrastructure and a lower base of young professionals that was able to win big last year. Following this trend, science is also changing. Brazil won the first “big league” prize in a scientific field – the Brazilian Artur Avila won the Fields Medal in Math in 2014. This International Prize is comparable to the Nobel Prize, but in this case for Mathematics. Brazil never won a Nobel Prize in Science or in any field. We are a developing country that plays soccer well. But, not anymore… In this blog post I will discuss how Brazilian Soccer and Science have been changing. I will also discuss examples of scientists that have International recognition and do research in Brazil or in the United States. Brazil is still a poor country with several problems; bureaucracy, corruption, lack of investments, violence and poor education. But, as a Brazilian, I’ve learned one thing after living abroad for a decade: we are very creative people. We can solve problems in a different way. There is also an expression for this in portuguese: “jeitinho brasileiro”. Last year Brazil lost the biggest tournament and a source of hope in a country full of maladies: the Soccer World Cup. Brazil lost in the semi-finals to Germany in the most outrageous game score ever: 7×1. Who would imagine that? Is Brazil loosing the “jeitinho brasileiro” in Soccer? The answer is yes. What makes a country good at soccer? (for more read “The Score” article about this subject). The answer is that there is no formula or rule. If you can’t study or be educated you just go and play soccer with your friends in your neighborhood. It is simple like this. But that is somehow changing. The country has changed. Artur Avila showed last year, the same year we’ve lost the World Cup in the worst manner ever, that we can win big in Science (for more check the Fields Medal Website: “A Brazilian Wunderkind Who Calms Chaos”). He won the most prestigious International Prize in Math studying the Chaos Theory. This indicates a trend: Brazil is getting better at science and loosing the soccer skills. This can’t be quantified right now, it is just my “very” subjective observation. In my last blog post I have criticized science in general and how the system is broken (for more see “Science is Broken”). And it is. But, there are some things happening here and there. Artur Avila is an example of a scientist living in Brazil (he travels to Paris, France every month to lecture and do projects in collaboration in Europe but resides in Brazil). Another example is the Brazilian Scientist living in the United States Miguel Nicolelis. He has everything to do with soccer. His research provided the resources necessary to build a machine-man interface that was used in the World Cup’s first game (see the TED Talk by Miguel Nicolelis: “Brain-to-Brain Communication has arrived”). He is a Professor at Duke University and is building a Neuroscience Program and Institute at the city Natal in Brazil. He built a Mind-controlled robotic suit that a paralyzed patient was wearing to do the first kick in the opening game of the World Cup. That is an example of a scientist from Brazil living abroad that is researching amazing things in the field of neuroscience. He was able to unite the passion of Brazil, soccer, to science (for more information check “World Cup to Debut Mind-Controlled Robotic Suit”). Thus, things have been changing in the soccer country. Maybe that is a good sign: we are getting better in science and worse in soccer. Using our minds, not just our legs to play. I believe this is just a tendency, but it is definitely a big change for Brazil. Brazil is doing science better for sure. The best part is that with less and less resources. But we, Brazilians, are creative. We always find ways to make things work.